Archives par étiquette : Yale

Publication : “The Medici’s Painter Carlo Dolci and Seventeenth-Century Florence”.

STRAUSSMAN-PFLANZER Eve (dir.),The Medici's Painter Carlo Dolci and Seventeenth-Century Florence,New Haven, Yale University Press, 2017, 128 p.

STRAUSSMAN-PFLANZER Eve (dir.),The Medici’s Painter Carlo Dolci and Seventeenth-Century Florence,New Haven, Yale University Press, 2017, 128 p.

Présentation de l’éditeur : 

Carlo Dolci (1616–1687), arguably the greatest painter in 17th-century Florence, was admired and patronized by the city’s leading families. Best known for his half-length and single-figure devotional pictures, Dolci was also a gifted painter of altarpieces and portraits.

Written by a team of distinguished scholars, The Medici’s Painter offers new archival discoveries and insights and features cross-disciplinary approaches to Dolci’s life and art and the cultural and political contexts in which he worked. The volume sheds new light on Dolci’s significant and impressive body of work. The painter understood the power of his paintings to inspire contemporaries, and his works continue to compel individuals to look closely and feel deeply about art.

Eve Straussman-Pflanzer is head of the European Art Department and Elizabeth and Allan Shelden Curator of European Paintings, Detroit Institute of Arts.

Plus d’informations sur le site de l’éditeur.

Publication : “Portrait of a Woman in Silk. Hidden Histories of the British Atlantic World”.

ANISHANSLIN Zara, Portrait of a Woman in Silk. Hidden Histories of the British Atlantic World, New Haven, Yale University Press, 2016, 432 p.

ANISHANSLIN Zara, Portrait of a Woman in Silk. Hidden Histories of the British Atlantic World, New Haven, Yale University Press, 2016, 432 p.

Présentation de l’éditeur :

Through the story of a portrait of a woman in a silk dress, historian Zara Anishanslin embarks on a fascinating journey, exploring and refining debates about the cultural history of the eighteenth-century British Atlantic world. While most scholarship on commodities focuses either on labor and production or on consumption and use, Anishanslin unifies both, examining the worlds of four identifiable people who produced, wore, and represented this object: a London weaver, one of early modern Britain’s few women silk designers, a Philadelphia merchant’s wife, and a New England painter.

Blending macro and micro history with nuanced gender analysis, Anishanslin shows how making, buying, and using goods in the British Atlantic created an object-based community that tied its inhabitants together, while also allowing for different views of the Empire. Investigating a range of subjects including self-fashioning, identity, natural history, politics, and trade, Anishanslin makes major contributions both to the study of material culture and to our ongoing conversation about how to write history. Continuer la lecture