Archives par étiquette : public sphere

Appel à communication : “La première impression : visages, vêtements et corps. 1600-1800 — ’First Impressions’ : Faces, Clothes, and Bodies, 1600-1800”.

Jean Raoux, Une dame devant son miroir, ca. 1720, huile sur toile, 79 x 64 cm, Londres, Wallace Collection.

Jean Raoux, Une dame devant son miroir, ca. 1720, huile sur toile, 79 x 64 cm, Londres, Wallace Collection.

Type : Appel à communication.
Date de la manifestation : 10 novembre 2016.
Lieu : York, university of York.
Date limite : 29 août 2016.

In the early modern world, ‘first impressions’ played a central role in the establishment and maintenance of individual and group identities; faces, clothes, and bodies provided a number of sensory clues as to a person’s gender, social status, age, and even health. Appearances were described, depicted, and consumed. However, anxiety over the potential for outward appearances to confuse, disguise, or deceive also gained increasing momentum in this period – ‘first impressions’ were not always as they seemed. Emulation and the erosion of the social hierarchy caused particular alarm, and even the most respectable members of society were now understood to be vulnerable to deception. Clothing, cosmetics, and deportment could all alter appearance and render ‘first impressions’ as shifting and uncertain. In addition, the dissemination of images and descriptions of appearances across the social hierarchy markedly increased throughout the period;the explosion of print culture meant that descriptions of felons were now widely circulated in newspapers, for example, whilst satirical prints prompted a familiarity with images of public figures. Continuer la lecture

Publication : Passion and Control : Dutch Architectural Culture of the Eighteenth Century.

SCHMIDT Freek, Passion and Control: Dutch Architectural Culture of the Eighteenth Century, Farnham, Ashgate, janvier 2016, 362 p.

SCHMIDT Freek, Passion and Control : Dutch Architectural Culture of the Eighteenth Century, Farnham, Ashgate, janvier 2016, 362 p.

Présentation de l’éditeur : 

Passion and Control explores Dutch architectural culture of the eighteenth century, revealing the central importance of architecture to society in this period and redefining long-established paradigms of early modern architectural history. Architecture was a passion for many of the men and women in this book; wealthy patrons, burgomasters, princes and scientists were all in turn infected with architectural mania. It was a passion shared with artists, architects and builders, and a vast cast of Dutch society who contributed to a complex web of architectural discourse and who influenced building practice. The author presents a rich tapestry of sources to reconstruct the cultural context and meaning of these buildings as they were perceived by contemporaries, including representations in texts, drawings and prints, and builds on recent research by cultural historians on consumerism, material culture and luxury, print culture and the public sphere, and the history of ideas and mentalities.

Pour en savoir plus, rendez-vous sur le site de l’éditeur.