Archives par étiquette : Picturing Death

Appel à publication : « Picturing Death 1200-1600 (Edited Volume) ».

Nicolas Poussin, La Mort de Chioné, vers 1622, huile sur toile, 109,5 x 159,5 cm, Lyon, Musée des Beaux-Arts.

Nicolas Poussin, La Mort de Chioné, vers 1622, huile sur toile, 109,5 x 159,5 cm, Lyon, Musée des Beaux-Arts.

Type : Appel à publication.
Date limite : 1er septembre 2016.

The glut of pictures of and for death has long been associated with the Middle Ages in the popular imagination. In reality, however, these images thrived in Europe in a much more concentrated period of time that straddles the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, as conventionally defined. Macabre artifacts ranging from monumental transi tombs to memento mori baubles, gory depictions of the death and torment of sacred figure as well as of the souls of the lay, gruesome medical and pharmacological illustrations, all proliferate in tandem with less unsettling (and far more widespread) works such as supplicant donor portraits and lavishly endowed chantry chapels, with the shared purpose of mitigating the horrors of death and the post-mortem state. The period in question, 1200-1600, is bracketed by two major moments in European cultural history. At its end is the aftermath of the Protestant Reformation, which altered Europeans’ approach to their own mortality and subsequently also aspects of the visual culture facilitating their practices. The beginning, 1200, is marked by the culmination of a conceptual shift that in a 1981 book Jacques le Goff termed the spatialization, or more famously, birth of Purgatory.
Continuer la lecture