Archives par étiquette : material culture

(Annulé) Conférence du GRHAM : “Gold in the ark of God and capitalism” par Natasha Eaton, 21 avril 2022, en visioconférence. (Annulé)

Frontispiece of The Padshahnama, c.1630s, Royal Collections, Windsor Castle.

Type : Conférence.
Date et horaire : Annulé.
Lieu : Visioconférence sur Zoom
Pour tout renseignement : asso.grham@gmail.com

This paper explores the agency of gold in South Asia as an ambiguous means of exchange and delightful control. As Taussig has suggested, gold can be an allegory for modernity qua labour in the miasmic mines of South American. If he explores the ‘metaphorical’ horrors of how exploitation is championed in Colombia and celebrated in the Museo del Oro, my examination of gold turns to its hidden status in statues in India and its mirror like quality in the shamsa. The shamsa is a sun bursting light form of geometric exactitude celebrated by the monarchs Akbar, Jahangir and ShahJahan. The sources of this form of gold speak to the now contested, derelict mines of Hutti. What does it mean to think of gold as celestial? Especially in the wake of material studies concerned with vibrant materiality? Is gold still to be colonized? Are there limits to decolonial thought?

Dr Natasha Eaton is Reader in the History of Art at UCL. She is a long serving editor of Third Text and the author of three monographs – Mimesis across empires: Artworks and networks in India, 1765-1860 (Duke University Press, 2013), Colour, Art and Empire: Visual culture and the nomadism of representation (I.B.Tauris, 2013) and Travel, Art and Collecting in South Asia: Vertiginous exchange (Routledge, 2021). She is currently at work on a special issue of Third Text with Manuela Ciotti on global collecting and modernity and on a monograph concerned with the materialities of empire provisionally titled The Unconditional Image: Art and labour in South Asia.

Annulé

Conférence du GRHAM : “Haptic, Somatic, Ubiquitous : Multi-disciplinary Textile Studies” par Amanda Phillips, 30 septembre 2021, en visioconférence.

Detail, textile with Quranic inscriptions made for use as a hanging in Mecca or Medina. Silk, lampas weave. Ottoman Empire, ca. 1600s. Istanbul, Topkapı Palace Museum 13/658. Presidency of the Republic of Turkey, Presidency of National Palaces Administration.

Type : Conférence.
Date et horaire : 30 septembre 2021 à 19h (CET-Paris).
Lieu : Visioconférence sur Zoom
Pour tout renseignement : asso.grham@gmail.com

Textiles were, and are, a major object of exchange, traded at all levels of all markets around the world. This talk focuses on the Ottoman Empire in the later seventeenth and eighteenth centuries and considers the many drivers of change in the production and consumption of textiles. Weavers making heavy figured velvets modelled their work on Italian and French prototypes, while those making light-weight silks and half-silks imitated Indian textiles, even in their names. The court also established new workshops in the capital, staffed with artisans from Poland and Chios, in order to supply its own needs for luxury silks. At the same time, weavers continued in traditional modes, making hangings for the shrines at Mecca and Medina, and consumers availed themselves with goods from centers from Aurangabad to Yanbol. With these examples and others, I’ll also argue that textiles—haptic, somatic, ubiquitous; in an immense range of types; with a collective status as a major commodity—demand new kinds of scholarly treatment. Continuer la lecture

Appel à communication: Travelling Objects. Ambassadors of the cultural transfer between Italy and the Habsburg monarchy

Type : Appel à communication.
Date limite appel à candidature: 15 janvier 2017.
Date de la manifestation : 19-20 mai 2017.
Lieu : Rome, Italie.

The international conference travelling objects will focus on the material aspects of cultural transfers: the exchange of paintings, designs/drawings, sculptures or books. Our specific interest is in the movement of these inherently ambassadorial objects between Italy and the Habsburg Monarchy during the 17th and 18th centuries, and their reception and role in the transmission of information and ideas between the North and the South. Special attention will be given to the agents of the exchange, who promoted, organized or mediated the exchange. Continuer la lecture

Appel à communication : “L’image miraculeuse dans le monde chrétien”.

Philippe de Champaigne, Le Christ en croix, XVIIe siècle, huile sur toile, 228 x 153 cm, Paris, musée du Louvre.

Philippe de Champaigne, Le Christ en croix, XVIIe siècle, huile sur toile, 228 x 153 cm, Paris, musée du Louvre.

Type : appel à communication.
Date : 3-5 novembre 2016.
Lieu : Rennes, université Rennes 2.
Date limite : 1er mars 2016.

 

Consacré aux images miraculeuses et à leur culte dans le christianisme occidental (XIVe-XVIIe siècles), le colloque a pour but d’envisager tous les aspects d’un phénomène majeur, qui a eu des répercussions dans la plupart des domaines de la vie religieuse, depuis la réflexion théologique jusqu’aux pratiques des pèlerins en passant par les dévotions privées ou encore l’aménagement des lieux de culte. En conjuguant questionnements et perspectives disciplinaires variés, la rencontre entend à la fois faire le bilan des recherches menées dans ce domaine et contribuer à leur renouvellement. Le colloque se tiendra à l’Université Rennes 2 les 3-4-5 novembre 2016. Continuer la lecture

Publication : Passion and Control : Dutch Architectural Culture of the Eighteenth Century.

SCHMIDT Freek, Passion and Control: Dutch Architectural Culture of the Eighteenth Century, Farnham, Ashgate, janvier 2016, 362 p.

SCHMIDT Freek, Passion and Control : Dutch Architectural Culture of the Eighteenth Century, Farnham, Ashgate, janvier 2016, 362 p.

Présentation de l’éditeur : 

Passion and Control explores Dutch architectural culture of the eighteenth century, revealing the central importance of architecture to society in this period and redefining long-established paradigms of early modern architectural history. Architecture was a passion for many of the men and women in this book; wealthy patrons, burgomasters, princes and scientists were all in turn infected with architectural mania. It was a passion shared with artists, architects and builders, and a vast cast of Dutch society who contributed to a complex web of architectural discourse and who influenced building practice. The author presents a rich tapestry of sources to reconstruct the cultural context and meaning of these buildings as they were perceived by contemporaries, including representations in texts, drawings and prints, and builds on recent research by cultural historians on consumerism, material culture and luxury, print culture and the public sphere, and the history of ideas and mentalities.

Pour en savoir plus, rendez-vous sur le site de l’éditeur.

Publication : Visual Cultures of Death in Central Europe : Contemplation and Commemoration in Early Modern Poland-Lithuania.

KOUNTY-JONES Alessandra, Visual Cultures of Death in Central Europe : Contemplation and Commemoration in Early Modern Poland-Lithuania, Leiden, Brill, 2015, 256 p.

KOUTNY-JONES Alessandra, Visual Cultures of Death in Central Europe : Contemplation and Commemoration in Early Modern Poland-Lithuania, Leiden, Brill, 2015, 256 p.

Présentation de l’éditeur :

In Visual Cultures of Death in Central Europe, Aleksandra Koutny-Jones explores the emergence of a remarkable cultural preoccupation with death in Poland-Lithuania (1569-1795). Examining why such interests resonated so strongly in the Baroque art of this Commonwealth, she argues that the printing revolution, the impact of the Counter-Reformation, and multiple afflictions suffered by Poland-Lithuania all contributed to a deep cultural concern with mortality.
Introducing readers to a range of art, architecture and material culture, this study considers various visual evocations of death including ‘Dance of Death’ imagery, funerary decorations, coffin portraiture, tomb chapels and religious landscapes. These, Koutny-Jones argues, engaged with wider European cultures of contemplation and commemoration, while also being critically adapted to the specific context of Poland-Lithuania.

Pour en savoir plus, rendez-vous sur le site de l’éditeur.