Archives par étiquette : Londres

Conférence : “Objects and Emotions: the London Foundling Hospital Textile Tokens, 1740-1770”

London Metropolitan Archives, copyright Coram.

Type : Conférence
Date de l’évènement : 30 novembre 2017 à 17h30
Lieu : Université Paris Diderot, 8 rue Albert Einstein, 75013 Paris. Salle 830 (Bâtiment Olympe de Gouges)

John Styles, professeur d’histoire moderne à l’université de Hertfordshire et ancien directeur du parcours de recherche au Victoria and Albert Museum, sera à Paris pour donner une conférence exceptionnelle dont le sujet est “Objects and Emotions: the London Foundling Hospital Textile Tokens, 1740-1770”.

Pionnier de l’histoire de la culture matérielle, John Styles travaille en particulier sur le textile et les consommations populaires. Il est l’auteur notamment de The Dress of the People (Yale University Press, 2007), et a été commissaire en 2010 de l’exposition “Threads of Feeling” qui s’est tenue au Foundling Hospital de Londres et qui portait sur les bouts de tissus (textile tokens) laissés en gage par les mères obligées de laisser leur enfant à l’orphelinat dans l’espoir que ce petit gage matériel leur permettrait un jour de pouvoir se faire reconnaître et identifier comme la mère de l’enfant.

Séance organisée par le LARCA / UMR 8225

 

 

 

Appel à communication : New Horizons in French Porcelain

Terrine, 1754 – 1770, porcelaine de Niderviller, Birmingham Museum of Art.

Type : Appel à communication

Date limite de l’appel à communication : 15 juin 2017

Date de l’événement : 20 – 21 octobre 2017

Lieu : Londres, The Wallace Collection

The French Porcelain Society is pleased to announce this year’s two-day symposium, entitled : ‘Saint-Cloud to Bernardaud: New Horizons in French Porcelain, 1690–2000’.

It will be chaired by Dr Aileen Dawson, former Curator, The British Museum, London, and will take place on 20–21 October 2017 at The Wallace Collection, London.

The symposium will present new research on French porcelain factories outside royal or state control. At times unjustly neglected in favour of the royal manufactory at Sèvres, these earliest factories operated from the late seventeenth century; many continue in production today. They include, but are not limited, to Saint–Cloud, Villeroy, Mennecy, Niderviller, the Paris factories, such as Dihl, Schoelcher and Dagoty, and Limoges factories operating during the 19th century and up to the present day. Subjects for consideration include: locations, size, capitalisation, techniques of manufacture, employment of artists and designers, marketing, and clientele, each deserving of greater scholarly attention. Continuer la lecture

Conférence : Collectors and Collections: Display and Taste in the Modern and Contemporary Periods

Giuliano Finelli, Portrait of Cardinal of Montalto, 1786, marbre, Berlin, Bode-Museum

Type : Conférence

Date : 7 juillet 2017

Lieu : Londres, Institute of Historical Research, Senate House, Mallet St. WC 1E 7HU

Collectors and Collections: Display and Taste in the Modern and Contemporary Periods

9.30 : Registration

MORNING SESSION : Chair Dr. Dora Thornton, Curator of the Waddesdon Bequest and Renaissance Europe, British Museum

9.45 : Opening remarks

10.00 : Lina Malfona, Adjunct Professor, Sapienza University, Rome A City as a collection:  the urban model of Villa Adriana

10.30 : Anna Seidel, Hamburg : The presentation of the Peretti Montalto sculpture collection in the time of Gianlorenzo Bernini Continuer la lecture

Publication : “Robert Adam’s London”.

SANDS Frances, Robert Adam’s, Londres, Oxford, Archaeopress, 2017, 142 p.

SANDS Frances, Robert Adam’s London, Oxford, Archaeopress, 2017, 142 p.

Présentation de l’éditeur :

The iconic eighteenth-century architect Robert Adam was based in London for more than half of his life and made more designs for this one city than anywhere else in the world. This book reviews a wide variety of his designs for London, highlighting lesser known buildings as well as familiar ones. Each of Adam’s projects explored in this book is plotted on Horwood’s map of London (1792–99), enabling readers to recognise Adam’s work as they move around the city, as well as to envisage London as if more of his ingenious designs had been executed or survived demolition.

Frances Sands is Curator of Drawings and Books at Sir John Soane’s Museum.

Plus d’informations sur le site de l’éditeur.

Publication : “Pierre Gouthière : Virtuoso Gilder at the French Court”.

BAULEZ Christian (dirs.) et VIGNON Charlotte (dirs.), Pierre Gouthière : Virtuoso Gilder at the French Court, Londres, Giles, 2016, 408 p.

BAULEZ Christian (dirs.) et VIGNON Charlotte (dirs.), Pierre Gouthière : Virtuoso Gilder at the French Court, Londres, Giles, 2016, 408 p.

Présentation de l’éditeur :

Pierre Gouthière: Virtuoso Gilder at the French Court celebrates the life of Pierre Gouthière (1732-1813), considered to be one of the best Parisian bronze chasers and gilders of the 18th century. Gouthière became gilder to Louis XV in 1767, and is credited with inventing a new type of gilding that left a matte finish—dorure au mat—one of the hallmarks of his work. Although incredibly successful in his day, Gouthière died in relative obscurity and poverty; unlike some of his contemporaries, his works never regained popularity after the French Revolution.

The inclusion of detailed entries and plates of forty works positively attributed to Gouthière, five essays by leading experts which examine Gouthière’s life, career, clientele, and gilding techniques, as well as examples of his work from US, Russian, and British collections, ensure that this beautiful volume is an invaluable new resource on Gouthière. Moreover, this is the first major study on Gouthière since 1920.

Charlotte Vignon is curator of Decorative Arts at The Frick Collection, New York. Christian Baulez is an historian of French 18th–century decorative arts and architecture and former chief curator at the Musée de Versailles. Anne Forray- Carlier is curator of 17th- and 18th-Century Decorative Arts at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris. Joseph Godla is chief conservator at the Frick Collection. Helen Jacobsen is chief curator at the Wallace Collection, London. Luisa Penalva is curator of Gold, Silver, and Jewelry Collections at the Museu Nacional de Arte Antiga, Lisbon. Anna Saratowicz-Dudyńska is curator of Silver and Bronze at the Royal Castle, Warsaw. Emmanuel Sarméo is an independent scholar.

Plus d’informations sur le site de l’éditeur.

Colloque : « Collecting and Display Conference : The Art Market, Collectors and Agents : Then and Now »

Antoine Watteau, L'Enseigne de Gersaint, 1720, huile sur toile, 166 × 306 m, Berlin,  Château de Charlottenburg,

Antoine Watteau, L’Enseigne de Gersaint, 1720, huile sur toile, 166 × 306 m, Berlin,
Château de Charlottenburg,

Type : Colloque
Date : 13 juillet 2016
Lieu : Warburg Institute, Londres
Inscription : Jusqu’au 11 juillet à agent.candd2016@gmail.com

The History of Collecting is becoming an increasingly important part of Cultural History, with many points of reference to political, social, religious, and gender history. The Collecting and Display Seminar investigates issues related to the history of archaeology and architecture, the history of private collections and museums, the great house, local antiquarians, the history of the natural sciences, court culture and diplomacy. Economic historians have added to our knowledge of the development of art markets in the past and the importance of the art trade, luxury markets, and networks of collectors. There is great interest in these topics both among the academic community and educated public, with highly successful exhibitions on court culture and publications on collections and early archaeology. The fact that there are now MA courses on history of collecting and museology, means that this is no longer the research interest of a few but that such investigations have wider appeal. At the moment there are working groups and projects in several European countries, but these appear to be working primarily on specific research projects or conferences.

Continuer la lecture

Appel à communication : « Fabrications : Designing for Silk in the 18th Century »

Frontispice du "Dessinateur"

Frontispice du “Dessinateur”

Type : Journée d’étude
Date limite pour envoyer une proposition : 4 septembre 2015.
Date et lieu de la journée d’étude : 5 mars 2016 – The Courtauld Institute of Art, Londres.
Comité scientifique :Katie Scott and Lesley Miller (The Courtauld Institute of Art).

Joubert de la Hiberderie’s Le Dessinateur d’étoffes d’or, d’argent, et de soie (1765) was the first book to be published on textile design in Europe. In preparation for the publication of an English translation and critical edition of the text this one day conference calls for papers that will analyse, critique, contextualise, review or otherwise engage with the Le dessinateur in the light of its themes : production, design, technology, education, botany and art.  Joubert’s manual argues for both a liberal and a technological education for the ideal designer.  Such a person must, he argues, have detailed knowledge of the materials, technologies and traditions of patterned silk in order successfully to propose new designs; he or she must also have taste and
an eye for beauty, which call, he says, for travel in order to see both the beauties of nature and those of art gathered in the gardens and galleries of Paris and the île de France.

We invite contributions from historians – of the book, of art and design, of science, of technology, and of matters social, industrial and economic. General questions we hope the conference will consider are : Who did Joubert hope to address through his book and to what end ? What was the international reach of the book ?  And what other texts were its competitors ? What does Le Dessinateur tell us about the status, role and skills of the designer ?  How did attitudes to gender inform Joubert’s notion of design and manufacture ?  How did his ideal designer compare to what we know about the careers and livelihoods of designers at Lyons and elsewhere ? What relationship did Joubert envisage between design and technology, drawing and weaving ? We welcome proposals that address silk in its uniqueness and also those attentive to its relations of difference and similarity to other textile technologies. Finally, we welcome submissions from writers and critics on contemporary textiles interested in thinking about issues of fabric threaded through concerns and examples from the past.

Whatever the historical perspective, we call for submissions that engage with the priorities and explicit arguments of Joubert’s text and also those that look at it awry : for example, with a view to the phenomenology as well as the technology of production, or with respect to the cut, tuck and fold as well than the plane in design, with regard also to the iterations of pattern in use as well as the invention of singular design motifs, or to give one last example, in relation to tradition and memory as well as novelty and fashion.

Please send your proposed title, a brief 150 word abstract and a short CV to Katie Scott (katie.scott@courtauld.ac.uk) and Lesley Miller (le.miller@vam.ac.uk) by Friday 4th September.  Some financial support for travel expenses may be available.

 

Compte rendu de visite : “Velázquez” (Grand Palais, 22/04/2015)

Dernièrement, les membres du GRHAM ont eu le privilège de visiter la rétrospective consacrée à Velázquez, actuellement au Grand Palais. Ils étaient, à cette occasion, guidés par Guillaume Kientz, commissaire de l’exposition et conservateur au département des peintures du musée du Louvre[1], et Laetitia Pérez, son assistante.

Cette exposition se propose, à travers un parcours chronologique ponctué de haltes thématiques, de dresser un état de la recherche concernant le maître espagnol. En effet, et aussi surprenant que cela puisse paraître pour un artiste de cette envergure, de nombreuses attributions demeurent incertaines. À titre d’exemple, la France ne possède que deux œuvres dont le caractère autographe est sans équivoque.
La production sévillane de Velázquez (1599-1660) est particulièrement sujette à ce type d’interrogations. Son apprentissage chez Pacheco (1564-1644), dont il épouse la fille en 1618, reste peu documenté et, bien que les inventaires après décès de la noblesse locale fournissent le nom de ses premiers clients, ils ne permettent que rarement l’identification d’un tableau du peintre. Dans l’espoir de permettre aux visiteurs de se familiariser avec le contexte artistique dans lequel il fait ses premières armes, mais aussi pour valider ou invalider des attributions plus ou moins hypothétiques, les premières salles de l’exposition, dont une consacrée au thème de l’Immaculée Conception, confrontent des peintures données à Velázquez à d’autres, exécutées par ses confères sévillans, tels que Pacheco ou son rival, Juan de Roelas (vers 1570-1625). Trois Saint Jean-Baptiste[2], dont un tantôt donné à Velázquez tantôt à Alonso Cano (1601-1667), se font ainsi face [Fig. 1].
Les bodegones[3], caractéristiques des débuts du peintre, illustrent, quant à eux, toute l’attention que ce dernier porte, tout comme les Hollandais, au rendu de la matérialité durant cette période.

Attribué à Diego Rodríguez de Silva y Velázquez (1599-1660) Saint Jean Baptiste au désert Vers 1623 Huile sur toile, 171 × 152 cm Chicago, The Art Institute of Chicago.

[Fig. 1] Attribué à Diego Rodríguez de Silva y Velázquez (1599-1660), Saint Jean Baptiste au désert, Vers 1623, Huile sur toile, 171 × 152 cm, Chicago, The Art Institute of Chicago.

Après un premier échec survenu en 1622, Velázquez parvient finalement, l’année suivante, à intégrer la Cour en réalisant un portrait de Philippe IV, qui le nomme « peintre de chambre ». Dès lors, la nature de son travail change. Sa tâche principale consiste désormais à portraiturer le roi et sa famille. Rapidement, il doit faire face aux ambitions de ses concurrents, tels que Vicente Carducho (vers 1576-1638) qui, pour le déprécier, affirme son incapacité à produire des tableaux d’histoire. Un concours, dont il ne reste aucune trace picturale, est alors organisé. Pour rendre compte de cette compétition, des œuvres d’Alonso Cano, Juan Bautista Maíno (1581-1649) et Juan Van der Hamen y León (1596-1631) sont ici mises en regard, tandis que la paternité du tableau intitulé Le Père Simon de Rojas sur son lit de mort [Fig. 2] fait débat. En effet, si Alfonso Emilio Pérez Sánchez[4] donnait cette peinture à Velázquez, Guillaume Kientz propose une attribution à Vicente Carducho.

Diego Rodríguez de Silva y Velázquez (1599-1660) ?, ici attribué à Vicente Carducho (vers 1576 – 1638) Le Père Simon de Rojas sur son lit de mort Vers 1624 Huile sur toile 101 × 121 cm Museo de Bellas Artes, Valence.

[Fig.2] Diego Rodríguez de Silva y Velázquez (1599-1660) ?, ici attribué à Vicente Carducho (vers 1576 – 1638), Le Père Simon de Rojas sur son lit de mort, Vers 1624, Huile sur toile, 101 × 121 cm, Museo de Bellas Artes, Valence.

Le premier voyage de Velázquez en Italie (1629-1630), entrepris grâce au soutien de Rubens (1577-1640), rencontré à Madrid en 1628, et au cours duquel le peintre sévillan découvre Venise et Tintoret, est évoqué par plusieurs tableaux dont La Forge de Vulcain (vers 1630), La Tunique de Joseph (vers 1630) et La Tentation de Saint Thomas d’Aquin (vers 1631-1633)[5]. Réalisées à l’initiative de Velázquez, La Forge de Vulcain (vers 1630) et La Tunique de Joseph (vers 1630) lui permettent de revendiquer ses talents de peintre d’histoire. Un autre tableau datant de cette période, la Rixe de soldats devant l’ambassade d’Espagne (vers 1630) [Fig. 3], unique huile sur bois que compte l’œuvre peint de l’artiste, semble préfigurer, via le traitement de l’articulation des figures, les œuvres précédemment citées.

Diego Rodríguez de Silva y Velázquez (1599-1660) Rixe de soldats devant l’ambassade d’Espagne Vers 1630 Huile sur bois, 28,9 × 39,6 cm Rome, Galleria Pallavicini.

[Fig. 3] Diego Rodríguez de Silva y Velázquez (1599-1660), Rixe de soldats devant l’ambassade d’Espagne, Vers 1630, Huile sur bois, 28,9 × 39,6 cm, Rome, Galleria Pallavicini.

À son retour à Madrid, Velázquez reprend son travail de portraitiste. Son principal modèle est l’infant Baltasar Carlos, l’héritier tant désiré, né en 1629. Certaines effigies, telles que le Portrait de l’infant Baltasar Carlos sur son poney (1634-1635) [Fig. 4], sont destinées au salon des Royaumes du Buen Retiro, le palais que Philippe IV se fait construire à l’apogée de son pouvoir.

Diego Rodríguez de Silva y Velázquez (1599-1660), Portrait de l’infant Baltasar Carlos sur son poney, 1634-1635, Huile sur toile, 211,5 × 177 cm, Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado.

[Fig. 4] Diego Rodríguez de Silva y Velázquez (1599-1660), Portrait de l’infant Baltasar Carlos sur son poney, 1634-1635, Huile sur toile, 211,5 × 177 cm, Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado.

S’ouvre alors une parenthèse mythologique qui donne à voir, entre autres, les deux versions du Démocrite[6] de Velázquez, qui font écho à celle de Rubens, l’ancien ami devenu rival, puis La Toilette de Vénus ou Vénus au miroir [Fig. 5], présentée en regard de l’Hermaphrodite endormi[7], dont elle s’inspire probablement. Encore très mystérieuse, cette peinture pose de nombreuses questions dont les réponses sont encore inconnues : l’identité du commanditaire, celle du modèle, la date et le lieu de production. Ici, Velázquez joue avec le spectateur. Tout en révélant la nudité de son modèle, il cache son visage qui, bien que présent dans le reflet du miroir, demeure trop indistinct pour être identifié.

Diego Rodríguez de Silva y Velázquez (1599-1660), La Toilette de Vénus ou Vénus au miroir, Vers 1647-1651, Huile sur toile, 122,5 × 177 cm, Londres, The National Gallery.

[Fig. 5] Diego Rodríguez de Silva y Velázquez (1599-1660), La Toilette de Vénus ou Vénus au miroir, Vers 1647-1651, Huile sur toile, 122,5 × 177 cm, Londres, The National Gallery.

La galerie de portraits du maître s’articule ensuite autour de deux axes, définis par l’identité des modèles : les courtisans d’une part, les hommes d’église d’autre part. À travers l’effigie du bouffon Pablo de Valladolid [Fig. 6], Velázquez s’approprie la liberté de ton inhérente au statut de son modèle, et s’autorise des fantaisies – l’habit de gentilhomme et la pose, vraisemblablement théâtrale – jamais tolérées en d’autres circonstances.

Diego Rodríguez de Silva y Velázquez (1599-1660), Portrait de Pablo de Valladolid, Vers 1635, Huile sur toile, 209 x 125 cm, Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado.

[Fig.6] Diego Rodríguez de Silva y Velázquez (1599-1660), Portrait de Pablo de Valladolid, Vers 1635, Huile sur toile, 209 x 125 cm, Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado.

Envoyé par Philippe IV en Italie pour la seconde fois, entre 1649 et 1651, afin d’acquérir, pour ce dernier, statues antiques et tableaux de grands maîtres, le peintre saisit l’occasion pour portraiturer le pape Innocent X[8].
Comme toujours pour un artiste de cette dimension, parvenir à distinguer, dans une œuvre, ce qui relève du maître de ce qui relève de l’atelier, est une tâche ardue. Dans cette optique, Guillaume Kientz a néanmoins pensé, en guise de conclusion, deux salles. La première est consacrée aux Velazqueños[9], comme José Antolínez (1635-1675), Pietro Martire Neri (1601-1661), Juan de Pareja (vers 1610-1670) et Juan Carreño de Miranda (1614-1685), la seconde à Juan Bautista Martínez del Mazo (vers 1612-1667), le gendre et l’élève de Velázquez, à ce point imprégné par l’art de son mentor que leurs personnalités artistiques se fondent encore l’une dans l’autre[10].

[1] Velázquez, Paris, Galeries Nationales du Grand Palais, 25 mars-13 juillet 2015. Commissariat : Guillaume KIENTZ, Paris, coédition Rmn – Grand Palais / Louvre, 2015.
[2] Bartolomeo CAVAROZZI (1587-1625), Saint Jean Baptiste, 1617-1619, Huile sur toile, 169 × 112 cm, Tolède, Cabildo Catedral Primada ; Bartolomé GONZALEZ (1564-1627), Saint Jean Baptiste, 1621, Huile sur toile, 150 × 90 cm, Budapest, Szépművészeti Muzeum ; Attribué à Diego RODRIGUEZ DE SILVA Y VELAZQUEZ (1599-1660), Saint Jean Baptiste au désert, Vers 1623, Huile sur toile, 171 × 152 cm, Chicago, The Art Institute of Chicago.
[3] Le terme bodegón désigne, en espagnol, une nature morte.
[4] Grand spécialiste de la peinture baroque espagnole, Alfonso Emilio Pérez Sánchez demeure, malgré son décès en 2010, une référence. À voir : PÉREZ SÁNCHEZ (Alfonso Emilio), Velázquez, Bologna, Capitol, 1980 ; Velázquez, Madrid, Museo del Prado, 23 janvier-31 mars 1990. Commissariat : Antonio DOMÍNGUEZ ORTIZ, Alfonso E. PÉREZ SÁNCHEZ, Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado, 1990.
[5] Diego RODRIGUEZ DE SILVA Y VELAZQUEZ (1599-1660), La Forge de Vulcain, Vers 1630, Huile sur toile, 222 × 290 cm, Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado ; La Tunique de Joseph, Vers 1630, Huile sur toile, 213,5 × 284 cm, Madrid, Real Monasterio de San Lorenzo de El Escorial ; La Tentation de Saint Thomas d’Aquin, Vers 1631-1633, Huile sur toile, 244 × 203 cm, Orihuela, Museo Diocesano de Arte Sacro.
[6] Diego RODRIGUEZ DE SILVA Y VELAZQUEZ (1599-1660), Démocrite, Vers 1627 – vers 1638, Huile sur toile, 101 x 81 cm, Rouen, musée des Beaux-Arts ; Homme au verre de vin, Vers 1630, Huile sur toile, 76,2 x 63, 5 cm, Toledo, Toledo Museum of Art.
[7] Hermaphrodite endormi, œuvre romaine d’époque impériale, IIe siècle après J.-C, marbre grec (hermaphrodite) et marbre de Carrare (matelas), 45 × 172 × 89 cm, Paris, musée du Louvre.
[8] Diego RODRIGUEZ DE SILVA Y VELAZQUEZ (1599-1660), Portrait du pape Innocent X, 1650, Huile sur toile, 140 × 120 cm, Rome, Galleria Doria Pamphilj.
[9] Sont ainsi qualifiés les suiveurs de Velázquez.
[10] CHECA (Fernando), Velázquez – Obra completa, Barcelona, Random House Mondadori, 2008.