Archives par étiquette : jacobitism

Appel à communication : The 3rd Earl of Bute, Politics & Collecting

Joshua Reynolds, Portrait de John Stuart 3ème comte de Bute (1713 – 1792), 1773, huile sur toile, Londres, National Portrait Gallery.

Type : Appel à communication

Date limite de l’appel : 1er mai 2017

Date de la manifestation : 2 octobre 2017

Lieu : Ecosse, The Hunterian, University of Glasgow, Scotland/ Mount Stuart, Isle of Bute.

Art of Power: The 3rd Earl of Bute, Politics and Collecting in Enlightenment Britain

In 2017, the Mount Stuart Trust and The Hunterian Art Gallery, University of Glasgow, will host a major exhibition merging art, biography, politics and cultural history. “Art of Power: Masterpieces from the Bute Collection” uncovers the fascinating Enlightenment figure, John Stuart, 3rd Earl of Bute (1713-1792), and his collection of rarely-seen masterpieces.

The Bute Collection was largely formed in the eighteenth century by John Stuart, the first Scottish-born Prime Minister and ‘favourite’ of George III. A three-day symposium, inspired by themes explored in the exhibition, seeks to bring together established and early career scholars from different faculties and professional backgrounds to discuss the dynamic interplay between art, politics and collecting so evident in the life of the 3rd Earl of Bute. Continuer la lecture

Publication : “Richard Rawlinson and His Seal Matrices : Collecting in the Early Eighteenth Century”.

CHERRY John, Richard Rawlinson and His Seal Matrices : Collecting in the Early Eighteenth Century, Oxford, The Ashmolean Museum, 2016, 192 p.

CHERRY John, Richard Rawlinson and His Seal Matrices : Collecting in the Early Eighteenth Century, Oxford, The Ashmolean Museum, 2016, 192 p.

Présentation de l’éditeur :

The Rawlinson collection of seal matrices in the University of Oxford is the most important early collection of European seal matrices to survive. Created by Dr Richard Rawlinson (1690-1755) in the first half of the eighteenth century, it consists of 830 matrices ranging in date from the 13th to the early 18th century. It includes the collection of seal matrices formed by Giovanni Andrea Lorenzani, a Roman bronze caster, which Rawlinson acquired in Rome together with a catalogue written in 1708. This collection is primarily Italian, but the Rawlinson collection also includes examples from many other countries England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland, France, Germany Spain, and Scandinavia as well as Italy. The study of seals was much neglected in the middle of the twentieth century, but the study now attracts greater interest. This is due to their visual appeal, sense of identity and their representation of symbols. This book will appeal to a wide variety of readers from those interested in collecting, Jacobitism, history of the early eighteenth century, the Grand Tour, antiquaries, and seals and seal matrices. This book has four introductory chapters which set the scene for the collecting of seal matrices, tell the life of Richard Rawlinson and Giovanni Andrea Lorenzani, analyze their collections and relate the history of the collection after Rawlinson’s death in 1755. One hundred seals, all illustrated, are described in detail, with much unpublished data, and an indication is given of the contribution they make to the sigillography of the different countries.

Plus d’informations sur le site de l’éditeur.