Archives par étiquette : Hogarth

Publication : “William Hogarth : A Complete Catalogue of the Paintings”.

EINBERG Elizabeth, William Hogarth : A Complete Catalogue of the Paintings, New Haven, Yale university press, 2017, 432 p.

EINBERG Elizabeth, William Hogarth : A Complete Catalogue of the Paintings, New Haven, Yale university press, 2017, 432 p.

Présentation de l’éditeur :

William Hogarth (1697–1764) was among the first British-born artists to rise to international recognition and acclaim and to this day he is considered one of the country’s most celebrated and innovative masters. His output encompassed engravings, paintings, prints, and editorial cartoons that presaged western sequential art. This comprehensive catalogue of his paintings brings together over twenty years of scholarly research and expertise on the artist, and serves to highlight the remarkable diversity of his accomplishments in this medium. Portraits, history paintings, theater pictures, and genre pieces are lavishly reproduced alongside detailed entries on each painting, including much previously unpublished material relating to his oeuvre. This deeply informed publication affirms Hogarth’s legacy and testifies to the artist’s enduring reputation.
Elizabeth Einberg is a senior research fellow at the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art and former curator at Tate Britain.

Plus d’informations sur le site de l’éditeur.

Publication : “Artistes, savants et amateurs : Art et sociabilité au XVIIIe siècle (1715–1815)”.

FRIPP Jessica (dirs.), GORSE Amandine (dirs.), MANCEAU Nathalie (dirs.), et STRUCKMEYER Nina (dirs.), Artistes, savants et amateurs : Art et sociabilité au XVIIIe siècle (1715–1815), Paris, Mare et Martin, 2016, 296 p.

FRIPP Jessica (dirs.), GORSE Amandine (dirs.), MANCEAU Nathalie (dirs.), et STRUCKMEYER Nina (dirs.), Artistes, savants et amateurs : Art et sociabilité au XVIIIe siècle (1715–1815), Paris, Mare et Martin, 2016, 296 p.

Présentation de l’éditeur :

La notion de sociabilité a fait l’objet, depuis quelques années, d’un renouvellement historiographique important. La complexité de cette notion impose pour son étude une approche pluridisciplinaire qui fasse appel aussi bien à la sociologie qu’à la philosophie, à l’anthropologie qu’à l’histoire de l’art.

Ce volume rassemble des études de spécialistes internationaux et explore la diversité des échanges sociaux dans le monde artistique du XVIIIe siècle. En examinant la sociabilité des divers acteurs de la création artistique, ces textes analysent les réseaux formés par le commerce des objets matériels, à travers l’étude des collections, du marché de l’art ou des expositions, et par le commerce des idées, à travers l’étude des écrits sur l’art et de l’art de la conversation. Le rôle des pratiques sociales au sein de la sphère publique dans l’évolution de la production artistique et des échanges matériels, économiques et intellectuels constitue donc l’objet de cet ouvrage collectif.

Table des matières :

Préface, Étienne Jollet
Introduction: La sociabilité, une notion équivoque, Jessica L. Fripp, Amandine Gorse, Nathalie Manceau et Nina Struckmeyer Continuer la lecture

Publication : Art in Britain 1660–1815.

SOLKIN David H., Art in Britain 1660–1815, Londres, Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, 2015, 378 p.

SOLKIN David H., Art in Britain 1660–1815, Londres, Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, décembre 2015, 378 p.

Présentation de l’éditeur :

Art in Britain 1660–1815 presents the first social history of British art from the period known as the long 18th century, and offers a fresh and challenging look at the major developments in painting, drawing, and printmaking that took place during this period. It describes how an embryonic London art world metamorphosed into a flourishing community of native and immigrant practitioners, whose efforts ultimately led to the rise of a British School deemed worthy of comparison with its European counterparts. Within this larger narrative are authoritative accounts of the achievements of celebrated artists such as Peter Lely, William Hogarth, Thomas Gainsborough, and J.M.W. Turner. David H. Solkin has interwoven their stories and many others into a critical analysis of how visual culture reinforced, and on occasion challenged, established social hierarchies and prevailing notions of gender, class, and race as Britain entered the modern age. More than 300 artworks, accompanied by detailed analysis, beautifully illustrate how Britain’s transformation into the world’s foremost commercial and imperial power found expression in the visual arts, and how the arts shaped the nation in return.

Pour en savoir plus, rendez-vous sur le site de l’éditeur.