Archives par étiquette : fashion

Colloque : “Fashioning Dress: Sewing and Skill, 1500-1850”

François-Alexandre-Pierre de Garsault, Art du tailleur : contenant le tailleur d’habits d’hommes, les culottes de peau, le tailleur de corps de femmes & enfants, la couturière & la marchande de modes, imp. de Delatour (Paris), 1769 (np).

Type : colloque.
Date : 19 mai 2017, 9h-18h.
Lieu : University of Warwick, Coventry, UK.

Milliners, mantua-makers, tailors, stay-makers, dressmakers, and embroiderers – both professional and domestic – made up an a diverse, knowledgeable, and skilled workforce. Their handiwork lay behind the creation of magnificent court robes and elaborate embroidery, as well as shirts, shifts, aprons and petticoats. This conference aims to investigate the skills, techniques, and methods involved in manufacturing clothing – both for men and women. It also engages with the innovative methodology of garment reproduction, and will investigate questions around the usefulness of this approach, and how to present and disseminate such research findings.

The keynote and conference papers will be followed by an interactive workshop, during which participants will have the opportunity to examine reproduction garments at various stages in the making process, and to try their hand at contemporary sewing skills.

This conference is organised by Dr Serena Dyer (Associate Fellow, Institute of Advanced Studies, University of Warwick and Curator of the Museum of Domestic Design and Architecture). For enquiries, please email s.f.c.dyer@warwick.ac.uk or fashioningdress@gmail.com. Continuer la lecture

Publication : “Clothing Art : The Visual Culture of Fashion, 1600–1914”.

RIBEIRO Aileen, Clothing Art : The Visual Culture of Fashion, 1600–1914, New Haven, Yale University Press, 2017, 582 p.

RIBEIRO Aileen, Clothing Art : The Visual Culture of Fashion, 1600–1914, New Haven, Yale University Press, 2017, 582 p.

Présentation de l’éditeur :

There have always been important links between art and clothing. Artists have documented the ever-evolving trends in fashion, popularized certain styles of dress, and at times even designed fashions. This is the first book to explore in depth the fascinating points of contact between art and clothing, and in doing so it constructs a new and innovative history of dress in which the artist plays a central role.

Aileen Ribeiro provides an illuminating account of the relationship between artists and clothing from the 17th century, when a more complex and sophisticated attitude to dress first appeared, to the early 20th century, when the boundaries between art and fashion became more fluid: haute couture could be seen as art, and art used textiles and clothes in highly imaginative ways. Ribeiro’s narrative encompasses such themes as the ways in which clothing has helped to define the nation state; how masquerade and dressing up were key subjects in art and life; and how, while many artists found increasing inspiration in high fashion, others became involved in designing ‘artistic’ and reform dress. Sumptuously illustrated, Clothing Art also delves into the ways in which artists represent the clothes they depict in their work, approaches which range from photographic detail, through varying degrees of imaginative reality, to generalized drapery.

Aileen Ribeiro is professor emeritus in the history of art at the Courtauld Institute of Art, London.

Plus d’informations sur le site de l’éditeur.

Publication : “Historical Style : Fashion and the New Mode of History, 1740-1830”.

CAMPBELL Timothy, Historical Style : Fashion and the New Mode of History, 1740–1830, Philadelphie, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016, 440 p.

CAMPBELL Timothy, Historical Style : Fashion and the New Mode of History, 1740–1830, Philadelphie, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016, 440 p.

Présentation de l’éditeur :

Historical Style connects the birth of eighteenth-century British consumer society to the rise of historical self-consciousness. Prior to the eighteenth century, British style was slow to change and followed the cultural and economic imperatives of monarchical regimes. By the 1750s, however, a growing fashion press extolled, in writing and illustration, the new phenomenon of periodized fashion trends. As fashion fads came in and out of style, and as fashion texts circulated and obsolesced, Britons were forced to confront the material persistence of out-of-date fashions. Timothy Campbell argues that these fashion texts and objects shaped British perception of time and history by producing new curiosity about the very recent past, as well as a new self-consciousness about the means by which the past could be understood.
In a panoptic sweep, Historical Style brings together art history, philosophy, and literary history to portray an era increasingly aware of itself. Burgeoning consumer society, Campbell contends, highlighted the distinction between the past and the present, created an expectation of continual change, and forged a sense of history as something that could be tracked through material objects. Campbell assembles a wide range of writings, images, and objects to render this eighteenth-century landscape: commercial dress displays and David Hume’s ideas of novelty as historical form; popular illustrations of recent fashion trends and Sir Joshua Reynolds’s aesthetic precepts; fashion periodicals and Sir Walter Scott’s costume-saturated historical fiction. In foregrounding fashion to trace eighteenth-century historicism, Historical Style draws upon the interdisciplinary, multimedia archival impressions that fashionable dress has left behind, as well as the historical and conceptual resources within the field of fashion studies that literary and cultural historians of eighteenth-century and Romantic Britain have often neglected.

Timothy Campbell teaches English at the University of Chicago.

Plus d’informations sur le site de l’éditeur.