Archives par étiquette : célébrité

Appel à communication : « La première impression : visages, vêtements et corps. 1600-1800 — ’First Impressions’ : Faces, Clothes, and Bodies, 1600-1800 ».

Jean Raoux, Une dame devant son miroir, ca. 1720, huile sur toile, 79 x 64 cm, Londres, Wallace Collection.

Jean Raoux, Une dame devant son miroir, ca. 1720, huile sur toile, 79 x 64 cm, Londres, Wallace Collection.

Type : Appel à communication.
Date de la manifestation : 10 novembre 2016.
Lieu : York, university of York.
Date limite : 29 août 2016.

In the early modern world, ‘first impressions’ played a central role in the establishment and maintenance of individual and group identities; faces, clothes, and bodies provided a number of sensory clues as to a person’s gender, social status, age, and even health. Appearances were described, depicted, and consumed. However, anxiety over the potential for outward appearances to confuse, disguise, or deceive also gained increasing momentum in this period – ‘first impressions’ were not always as they seemed. Emulation and the erosion of the social hierarchy caused particular alarm, and even the most respectable members of society were now understood to be vulnerable to deception. Clothing, cosmetics, and deportment could all alter appearance and render ‘first impressions’ as shifting and uncertain. In addition, the dissemination of images and descriptions of appearances across the social hierarchy markedly increased throughout the period;the explosion of print culture meant that descriptions of felons were now widely circulated in newspapers, for example, whilst satirical prints prompted a familiarity with images of public figures. Continuer la lecture

Publication : « Women Artists in Early Modern Italy : Careers, Fame, and Collectors ».

BARKER Sheila (dir.), Women Artists in Early Modern Italy : Careers, Fame, and Collectors, Turnhout, Brepols, 2016, 176 p.

BARKER Sheila (dir.), Women Artists in Early Modern Italy : Careers, Fame, and Collectors, Turnhout, Brepols, 2016, 176 p.

Présentation de l’éditeur :

Enhancing our understanding of early Italian female painters including Sofonisba Anguissola and introducing new ones such as Costanza Francini and Lucrezia Quistelli, this volume studies women artists, their patrons, and their collectors, in order to trace the rise of the social phenomenon of the woman artist.

In ten chapters spanning two centuries, this collection of essays examines the relationships between women artists and their publics, both in early modern Italy as well as across Europe. Drawing upon archival evidence, these essays afford abundant documentary information about the diverse strategies that women found for carrying out their artistic careers, from Sofonisba Anguissola’s role as a lady-in-waiting at the court of Felipe II of Spain, to Lucrezia Quistelli’s avoidance of the Florentine market in favor of upholding the prestige of her family, to Costanza Francini’s preference for the steady but humble work of candle painting for a Florentine confraternity.

Continuer la lecture