Archives par étiquette : body

Appel à communication : Re/presenting the Body: Between Art and Science AAH Summer Symposium 2017

Jacques Gautier d’Agoty, Planche montrant les muscles de la tête, 1747, dans Du Verney, Joseph-Guichard, Myologie complete en couleur et grandeur naturelle.

Type : appel à communication

Date limite de l’appel : 16 avril 2017

Date de la manifestation : 6 – 7 juillet 2017

Lieu : University of Glasgow

The representation of the human body has been a central concern for artists and scientists across cultures. It has been, and continues to be, a source of interest, inspiration, investigation and experimentation. This Summer Symposium aims to contribute to this fascinating area of academic interest by adding its own art historical exploration to the conversation. Continuer la lecture

Appel à communication : “La première impression : visages, vêtements et corps. 1600-1800 — ’First Impressions’ : Faces, Clothes, and Bodies, 1600-1800”.

Jean Raoux, Une dame devant son miroir, ca. 1720, huile sur toile, 79 x 64 cm, Londres, Wallace Collection.

Jean Raoux, Une dame devant son miroir, ca. 1720, huile sur toile, 79 x 64 cm, Londres, Wallace Collection.

Type : Appel à communication.
Date de la manifestation : 10 novembre 2016.
Lieu : York, university of York.
Date limite : 29 août 2016.

In the early modern world, ‘first impressions’ played a central role in the establishment and maintenance of individual and group identities; faces, clothes, and bodies provided a number of sensory clues as to a person’s gender, social status, age, and even health. Appearances were described, depicted, and consumed. However, anxiety over the potential for outward appearances to confuse, disguise, or deceive also gained increasing momentum in this period – ‘first impressions’ were not always as they seemed. Emulation and the erosion of the social hierarchy caused particular alarm, and even the most respectable members of society were now understood to be vulnerable to deception. Clothing, cosmetics, and deportment could all alter appearance and render ‘first impressions’ as shifting and uncertain. In addition, the dissemination of images and descriptions of appearances across the social hierarchy markedly increased throughout the period;the explosion of print culture meant that descriptions of felons were now widely circulated in newspapers, for example, whilst satirical prints prompted a familiarity with images of public figures. Continuer la lecture

Publication : “Fleshing out Surfaces : Skin in French Art and Medicine, 1650–1850”.

FEND Mechthild, Fleshing out Surfaces : Skin in French Art and Medicine, 1650–1850, Manchester, Manchester University Press, 2016, 376 p.

FEND Mechthild, Fleshing out Surfaces : Skin in French Art and Medicine, 1650–1850, Manchester, Manchester University Press, 2016, 376 p.

Présentation de l’éditeur :

Fleshing out Surfaces is the first English-language book on skin and flesh tones in art. It considers flesh and skin in art theory, image making, and medical discourse in seventeenth- to nineteenth-century France. Describing a gradual shift between the early modern and the modern period, it argues that what artists made when imitating human nakedness was not always the same. Initially understood in terms of the body’s substance—of flesh tones and body colour—it became increasingly a matter of skin, skin colour, and surfaces. Each chapter is dedicated to a different notion of skin and its colour, from flesh tones via a membrane imbued with nervous energy to hermetic borderline. Looking in particular at works by Fragonard, David, Girodet, Benoist, and Ingres, the focus is on portraits, as facial skin is a special arena for testing painterly skills and a site where the body and the image become equally expressive.

Plus d’informations sur le site de l’éditeur.