Appel à communication : “Power Couples : The Pendant Format in Art”.

Honoré Revelly, Portrait du peintre Verdussen, de sa femme et de sa servante, 1761, peinture à l’huile sur toile, 169×145 cm, Toulon: Musée d’art

Type : appel à communication.
Date limite de l’appel : 15 juin 2019.
Date de l’événement : 4 octobre 2019.
Lieu : Utah Museum of Fine Arts, University of Utah, Salt Lake City.

The Utah Museum of Fine Arts at the University of Utah will host an interdisciplinary symposium to coincide with the upcoming special exhibition Power Couples: The Pendant Format in Art (11 July — 8 December 2019), which will examine ideas imparted by two interdependent works (called pendants) from the fifteenth century until the present day. Papers that consider works conceived as pairs in the visual arts, literature, and music are invited, and new research related to pairs in other disciplines is encouraged. What are the artistic strategies at play in the creation of companion pieces? How do the format and display (or experience) of pendants communicate meaning ?

Advanced graduate students, as well as established and emerging scholars, are invited to apply. Please submit an abstract of 250–300 words and a CV to both leslie.anderson@umfa.utah.edu and iris.moulton@umfa.utah.edu by 15 June 2019. Selected participants will be notified on or before 15 July 2019.

This symposium is organized by Leslie Anderson, Curator of European, American, and Regional Art, and Iris Moulton, Coordinator of Campus Engagement, at the Utah Museum of Fine Arts, University of Utah.

Keynote Speaker

Wendy N. E. Ikemoto is Associate Curator of American Art at the New-York Historical Society. She served as organizing curator for Rockwell, Roosevelt & the Four Freedoms (2018), Betye Saar: Keepin’ It Clean (2018–19), Bettina von Zwehl: Meditations in an Emergency (2018–19), and Augusta Savage: Renaissance Woman (2019), and as curator for Panoramic Perspectives (2019–20). She is planning an upcoming exhibition on the American romantic artist John Quidor. Prior to joining the New-York Historical Society, Ikemoto worked in academia at The Courtauld Institute of Art in London and Vassar College in New York and in secondary education at a school for Native Hawaiian students. She holds a BA in Art History from Stanford University and an AM and PhD in the History of Art and Architecture from Harvard University. Her publications include Antebellum American Pendant Paintings: New Ways of Looking (Routledge, 2017) and articles in American Art and The Burlington Magazine.