Archives par étiquette : Roma

Colloque : « Mazarin, Rome & l’Italie ».

Pierre Mignard, Portrait du cardinal Mazarin, 1661, huile sur toile, 65 x 55 cm, Chantilly, musée Condé.

Pierre Mignard, Portrait du cardinal Mazarin, 1661, huile sur toile, 65 x 55 cm, Chantilly, musée Condé.

Type : colloque.
Date et horaire : du 11 au 13 mai 2017.
Lieu : Bibliothèque Mazarine et Ecole des chartes, Paris.

Ce colloque, qui prend la suite du colloque Mazarin, les lettres et les arts (Institut de France, décembre 2002, actes publiés en 2006), portera sur les liens de Mazarin avec Rome et l’Italie, pendant sa période romaine, jusqu’en 1643, puis pendant son ministériat en France. Dans une double perspective, celle de l’histoire et celle de l’histoire des arts, on y étudiera ses réseaux (diplomatiques, politiques, religieux, familiaux, de renseignement, les uns et les autres étant souvent mêlés), son collectionnisme, son mécénat, sa propagande.

Programme :

Jeudi 11 mai 2017 – Bibliothèque Mazarine

HISTOIRE DES ARTS. Président de séance : Yann SORDET (Directeur de la Bibliothèque Mazarine)

14h-Accueil
14h15-14h55 : Patrick MICHEL (Professeur, Université de Lille 3-Charles de Gaulle), « La succession de Mazarin à Rome et en France ».
14h55-15h35 : Yvan LOSKOUTOFF (Professeur, Université du Havre, Académie des Jeux floraux), « Anne et Jules, ou la symbolique partagée : un portrait de la reine par Jean Valdor et ses sources chez les Barberini ».
15h35-16h15 ; Delphine CARRANGEOT (Maître de conférences, Université de Versailles-Saint-Quentin), « Mazarin et la collection dispersée des Gonzague de Mantoue : enjeux politiques et diplomatiques d’une affaire artistique internationale ».
Pause
16h30-17h10 : Sonia CAVICCHIOLI (Professeur, Université de Bologne), « Une ‘mazarinette’ entre la France et l’Italie. Laura Martinozzi d’Este et son mécénat ».
17h10-17h50 : Simone SIROCCHI (Docteur, Université de Bologne), « Mazarin et la fabrique du portrait à la cour de Francesco Ier d’Este (1610-1658) ».
17h50-18h30 : Fabrizio FEDERICI (Docteur, boursier de la Biblioteca Hertziana), « Un partisan de la France en quête de protection : ce ‘bon vieux’ chevalier Francesco Gualdi et le cardinal Mazarin ».

Continuer la lecture

Publication : « Baroque Antiquity. Archaeological Imagination in Early Modern Europe ».

TSCHUDI Victor Plahte, Baroque Antiquity. Archaeological Imagination in Early Modern Europe, Cambridge, Cambridge university press, septembre 2016, 100 p.

TSCHUDI Victor Plahte, Baroque Antiquity. Archaeological Imagination in Early Modern Europe, Cambridge, Cambridge university press, septembre 2016, 100 p.

Présentation de l’éditeur :

Why were seventeenth-century antiquarians so spectacularly wrong? Even if they knew what ancient monuments looked like, they deliberately distorted the representation of them in print. Deciphering the printed reconstructions of Giacomo Lauro and Athanasius Kircher, this pioneering study uncovers an antiquity born with print culture itself and from the need to accommodate competitive publishers, ambitious patrons and powerful popes. By analysing the elements of fantasy in Lauro and Kircher’s archaeological visions, new levels of meaning appear. Instead of being testimonies of failed archaeology, they emerge as complex architectural messages responding to moral, political, and religious issues of the day. This book combines several histories – print, archaeology, and architecture – in the attempt to identify early modern strategies of recovering lost Rome. Many books have been written on antiquity in the Renaissance, but this book defines an antiquity that is particularly Baroque.

Victor Plahte Tschudi is a Professor in Architectural History at the Oslo School of Architecture and Design. He writes on the interpretation of Roman monuments in texts and images from the Renaissance to the present.

Plus d’informations sur le site de l’éditeur.

Publication : « The Villa Laurentina of Pliny the Younger in an 18th-Century Vision ».

MIZIOLEK Jerzy, The Villa Laurentina of Pliny the Younger in an 18th-Century Vision, Rome, L’Erma di Bretschneider, 2016, 250 p.

MIZIOLEK Jerzy, The Villa Laurentina of Pliny the Younger in an 18th-Century Vision, Rome, L’Erma di Bretschneider, 2016, 250 p.

Présentation de l’éditeur :

The book deals with a paper reconstruction of Pliny the Younger’s (c. AD 61–112) villa near Ostia, some twenty kilometres from Rome. This unique work was created in Rome in the years 1777–78 by a young Pole, Count Stanisław K. Potocki (1755–1821) in cooperation with Giuseppe Manocchi and other outstanding artists of the time. The work, originally in the Potocki collection in Wilanów, is today housed in the iconographic collection of the National Library, Warsaw. It contains over thirty large-format, color drawings. In the late 18th century, probably during his last sojourn in Italy (1795–97), Count Potocki wrote a 24-page-long commentary to his work, entitled Notes et Idées sur la Villa de Pline. This hitherto unpublished manuscript commentary and reconstruction drawings of the villa are now published together with a virtual visualisation of the villa produced in 3D Studio Max 2014. Continuer la lecture

Publication : « Rome, Travel, and the Sculpture Capital, c. 1770–1825 ».

MACSOTAY Tomas (dir.), Rome, Travel, and the Sculpture Capital, c. 1770–1825, New York, Routledge, 2016, 268 p.

MACSOTAY Tomas (dir.), Rome, Travel, and the Sculpture Capital, c. 1770–1825, New York, Routledge, 2016, 268 p.

Présentation de l’éditeur :

The world that shaped Europe’s first national sculptor-celebrities, from Schadow to David d’Angers, from Flaxman to Gibson, from Canova to Thorvaldsen, was the city of Rome. Until around 1800, the Holy See effectively served as Europe’s cultural capital, and Roman sculptors found themselves at the intersection of the Italian marble trade, Grand Tour expenditure, the cult of the classical male nude, and the Enlightenment republic of letters. Two sets of visitors to Rome—the David circle and the British traveler—have tended to dominate Rome’s image as an open artistic hub, while the lively community of sculptors of mixed origins has not been awarded similar attention. Rome, Travel, and the Sculpture Capital, c. 1770–1825 is the first study to piece together the labyrinthine sculptors’ world of Rome between 1770 and 1825. The volume sheds new light on the links connecting Neo-classicism, sculpture collecting, Enlightenment aesthetics, studio culture, and queer studies. The collection offers ideal introductory reading on sculpture and Rome around 1800, and its provocative perspectives will appeal to a readership interested in understanding a modernized Europe’s transnational desire for Neo-classical, Roman sculpture.

Plus d’informations sur le site de l’éditeur.

Publication : « Richard Rawlinson and His Seal Matrices : Collecting in the Early Eighteenth Century ».

CHERRY John, Richard Rawlinson and His Seal Matrices : Collecting in the Early Eighteenth Century, Oxford, The Ashmolean Museum, 2016, 192 p.

CHERRY John, Richard Rawlinson and His Seal Matrices : Collecting in the Early Eighteenth Century, Oxford, The Ashmolean Museum, 2016, 192 p.

Présentation de l’éditeur :

The Rawlinson collection of seal matrices in the University of Oxford is the most important early collection of European seal matrices to survive. Created by Dr Richard Rawlinson (1690-1755) in the first half of the eighteenth century, it consists of 830 matrices ranging in date from the 13th to the early 18th century. It includes the collection of seal matrices formed by Giovanni Andrea Lorenzani, a Roman bronze caster, which Rawlinson acquired in Rome together with a catalogue written in 1708. This collection is primarily Italian, but the Rawlinson collection also includes examples from many other countries England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland, France, Germany Spain, and Scandinavia as well as Italy. The study of seals was much neglected in the middle of the twentieth century, but the study now attracts greater interest. This is due to their visual appeal, sense of identity and their representation of symbols. This book will appeal to a wide variety of readers from those interested in collecting, Jacobitism, history of the early eighteenth century, the Grand Tour, antiquaries, and seals and seal matrices. This book has four introductory chapters which set the scene for the collecting of seal matrices, tell the life of Richard Rawlinson and Giovanni Andrea Lorenzani, analyze their collections and relate the history of the collection after Rawlinson’s death in 1755. One hundred seals, all illustrated, are described in detail, with much unpublished data, and an indication is given of the contribution they make to the sigillography of the different countries.

Plus d’informations sur le site de l’éditeur.