Archives par étiquette : Pamela or Virtue Rewarded

Appel à communication : Epistolary Discourse: Letters and Letter-Writing in Early Modern Art

 

llustration of Pamela: or, Virtue rewarded. In a series of Familiar Letters from a Beautiful Young Damsel to her Parents by Samuel Richardson (1741)

Type : Appel à publication

Date limite de l’appel : 1er juillet 2017

While cultural historians have recently published a number of studies on letters and letter-writing in Early Modern Europe, the subject has not been sufficiently explored from an art historical perspective.

Though some texts on Early Modern private life offer insight on the prominence of the theme in art, a more exhaustive analysis is in order, especially since letters and letter-writing are depicted in art in other contexts besides the domestic realm. Indeed Early Modern epistolary discourse falls into both private and public categories. In the private sector, the Early Modern period saw a significant increase in literacy, especially among women, mainly due to the development of the printing press and the subsequent proliferation of texts. Women no longer dictated their letters to others, but wrote them themselves. As letter-writers, they could now take on intimate roles, such as that of mothers, lovers, or travelers, without the intrusion of a writing assistant. In the public sector, members of the papal curia exchanged letters to publicize new statutes, while spiritual leaders in general often corresponded to offer religious instruction and guidance. Continuer la lecture