Archives par étiquette : early modern

Conférence : « The reception of antiquity in Early Modern Times: Historiography and Antiquarianism in Britain and Germany compared »

Joseph Mallord William Turner, Dido building Carthage, or The Rise of the Carthaginian Empire, 1815, oil on canvas, 155.5 x 230 cm, London, National Gallery.

 

Type : Conférence
Dates : 31 août – 2 septembre 2017
Lieu : University of Bayreuth, History Department/Prinz-Albert-Society, Coburg, Germany

The different views of antiquity, of one’s own, regional or local classical history and of ‘antique‘ remains in various parts of Europe – and, in a comparative perspective, beyond – have received a growing interest both in Britain and on the continent in recent years. And while it seems fair to say that overarching narratives of European Renaissance and Humanism, of transnational Baroque scholarship and Enlightenment remain dominant, we have come to a much more refined view of the different attitudes to « Antiquities“ and « the Antique“ in various parts of Early Modern Europe.

And it is not only those attitudes that were remarkably varied: behind them, different political and social conditions of scholarship in general and of individual historians and antiquaries in particular deserve close study. However, a comparison between Britain and Germany has rarely been sought, and in filling this – to our minds, substantial – gap, our conference intends to contribute to such a study.

Speakers include: Vittoria Feola (Padua/Oxford/Rome), Richard Hingley (Durham), Kelsey Jackson Williams (Stirling), Marian Nebelin (Chemnitz), Ronny Kaiser (Berlin), William Stenhouse (New York), Silvia Pfister (Coburg); keynote speaker will be Caspar Hirschi (St. Gallen).

The Prince-Albert-Society (Patron: HRH The Duke of Edinburgh) is a scholarly society founded in 1981 and devoted to research on scientific, cultural and political aspects of Anglo-German relations. Since ist beginnings, the society has organized annual conferences on a wide range of relevant topics. A joint foundation of the town of Coburg and the University of Bayreuth, the society is based in Coburg, an historic town of 40.000 inhabitants in the north of Bavaria and former seat of the dukes of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha.

Journée d’étude : « Spanish Royal Geographies in Early Modern Europe and America: Re-thinking the Royal Sites / Geographies of Habsburg Politics and Religion »

Ferdinand VI and Barbara of Braganza in the Gardens of Aranjuez, 1756. Oil on canvas, 68 x 112 cm, Madrid, Museo del Prado.

Type : journée d’étude.
Date : 4 – 5 mai 2017.
Lieu : Berrick Saul Lecture Theatre, University of York, Heslington, York, UK.

Spanish royal sites were a diverse and global network in early modern World making royal power visible and effectual. They expanded to other territory intermittently under Spanish rule beyond the Iberian Peninsula such as the Duchy of Milan, the Kingdom of Naples and Sicily, the ten southernmost provinces of the Netherlands and the viceroyalties in America. They consisted of royal palaces and their affiliated landscapes such as forests, gardens, rural and urban centres, farms and factories. They were not only centres of administration, but also centres of innovation in culture, taste and technology. In this way, they were points for the transfer of knowledge, people and goods affording expansion and growth of the market place.

This symposium will investigate these centres as international geographies. The term ‘geography’ manifests our interest in the way the physicality of spaces and landscapes was acted upon and produced through cultural practices. This interlacing of physical and human agency is naturally wide-ranking and encompasses image-making, architectural, agricultural and administrative processes. Moreover, the religious geographies in Habsburg territories were particularly complex given that courtly forms of piety were coloured by local customs and traditions.

How were these royal geographies imagined and described? In what way do they activate histories and memories thus constructing loci of myth? How do they challenge existing interpretations of the boundaries between confessional identities and political solidarities? How do they help us to re-think the divisions between centres and peripheries of Habsburg power as kinetic and embodied spaces? For example, royal geographies beyond the kingdom of Castille within the Iberian Peninsula were ever more tightly interlinked with Madrid under Philip III and Philip IV when their respective favourites, the First Duke of Lerma and the Count-Duke of Olivares, were appointed as governors of the royal palaces in Castille and Andalusia and assumed authority over the Junta de Obras y Bosques, a committee set up by Philip II to manage the construction program of royal residences and palaces.

This workshop aims to reunite experts in this field, all from different disciplines (History of Art, History, History of Architecture, and Political Thought), with the objective of developing a comparative perspective on the complexities of royal geographies in a trans-national context.

This symposium is a collaboration of the History of Art Department and CREMS (Centre for Renaissance and Early Modern Studies) at the University of York, the University of Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid (URJC), and the University Institute ‘La Corte en Europa’ (IULCE ) of the Autonomous University of Madrid (UAM).

For registration and see the full programme: spanishroyalspirituality.wordpress.com

Colloque : « Early Modern Viewers and Buildings in Motion »

Fischer von Erlach, "Tour de Nankin", in Plan of Civil and Historical Architecture, 1721

Fischer von Erlach, « Tour de Nankin », in Plan of Civil and Historical Architecture, 1721.

Type : Colloque
Date : 25 février 2017.
Lieu : University of Cambridge, St. John’s College, Old Divinity School.

Movement, both literal and metaphorical, lies at the heart of early modern European architectural theory, design and experience. Architectural authors invoked the notion of progress as temporal motion, structured their books as tours of buildings, and followed the ancient Roman Vitruvius in explaining how to manipulate the motions of winds through building design.  Simultaneously, poets led their readers on tours of house and estate, and Aristotelian as well as mechanistic philosophers averred that motion was inherent to human perception from particle vibrations in one’s senses to neural vibrations in one’s brain.  Across a range of scales in actual lived experience, moreover, viewers and buildings were frequently in motion; people walked through built spaces, interiors contained portable furnishings, and travellers and prints circulated ideas of buildings internationally. Continuer la lecture