Archives par étiquette : britain

Symposium : « Graphic satire and the UK in the long nineteenth century », University of Nottingham

 

James Gillray (artist), Hannah Humphrey (publisher), A Hackney Meeting, 1796, etching, London, Victoria and Albert Museum
© Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Type : Conférence
Date : 5 septembre 2017, 9h-18h30
Lieu :  A30 Lecture Theatre, Lakeside Arts, University of Nottingham, UK.

A one-day symposium convened by Professor Fintan Cullen and Dr Richard A Gaunt, University of Nottingham. Keynote speaker: Professor Brian Maidment (Liverpool John Moores University).

This one-day international symposium seeks to interrogate the nature of the United Kingdom’s status as a global power in the long nineteenth century (c.1780-1920) by considering the varied ways in which it was viewed, and represented, in graphic satire during this period. The years from c.1780- 1920 encompassed events with widely-felt repercussions, generating interest and commentary well outside the countries in which they occurred. In turn, these events required the United Kingdom – which came into existence with the union between Great Britain and Ireland in 1801 – to consider its reach, role and reputation on a global scale. In the period up to 1815, for example, the American Wars of Independence (1775-83), the French Revolution of 1789, the wars against Revolutionary and Napoleonic France (1793-1815) and the Battle of Waterloo (1815), all made the United Kingdom think outside its purely domestic political situation. The establishment of peace terms in 1815 ushered in what historians once described as the ‘Pax Britannica’ or century of ‘British’ peace. Over the course of the next century, the United Kingdom became increasingly defined by the range of its global interests, both in terms of its formal and informal empire, its diplomatic activity and its continuing participation in naval and military conflict. By the end of the period, the United Kingdom’s global status was challenged by the repercussions of World War One (1914-18) and the impending dissolution of
the Union with Ireland (1922).

The symposium provides an opportunity to explore the United Kingdom’s global relationships in this period in graphic political and personal satires. It builds on a growing body of work which explores the subject from the perspective of individual satirists such as Gillray, Rowlandson, Cruikshank and Doyle, as well as studies of well-known satirical print titles like Punch and personifications of ‘Britishness’ such as John Bull. Papers which consider the United Kingdom’s global relationships from the perspective of the constituent parts of the United Kingdom (England, Scotland, Wales  and Ireland) and from overseas will be presented, as will papers which reflect upon issues of race, gender, nationhood and ethnicity across the period in question.

For more information on the speakers and programme, see: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/conference/fac-arts/humanities/history/graphic-satire/graphic-satire.aspx

Conférence : « The reception of antiquity in Early Modern Times: Historiography and Antiquarianism in Britain and Germany compared »

Joseph Mallord William Turner, Dido building Carthage, or The Rise of the Carthaginian Empire, 1815, oil on canvas, 155.5 x 230 cm, London, National Gallery.

 

Type : Conférence
Dates : 31 août – 2 septembre 2017
Lieu : University of Bayreuth, History Department/Prinz-Albert-Society, Coburg, Germany

The different views of antiquity, of one’s own, regional or local classical history and of ‘antique‘ remains in various parts of Europe – and, in a comparative perspective, beyond – have received a growing interest both in Britain and on the continent in recent years. And while it seems fair to say that overarching narratives of European Renaissance and Humanism, of transnational Baroque scholarship and Enlightenment remain dominant, we have come to a much more refined view of the different attitudes to « Antiquities“ and « the Antique“ in various parts of Early Modern Europe.

And it is not only those attitudes that were remarkably varied: behind them, different political and social conditions of scholarship in general and of individual historians and antiquaries in particular deserve close study. However, a comparison between Britain and Germany has rarely been sought, and in filling this – to our minds, substantial – gap, our conference intends to contribute to such a study.

Speakers include: Vittoria Feola (Padua/Oxford/Rome), Richard Hingley (Durham), Kelsey Jackson Williams (Stirling), Marian Nebelin (Chemnitz), Ronny Kaiser (Berlin), William Stenhouse (New York), Silvia Pfister (Coburg); keynote speaker will be Caspar Hirschi (St. Gallen).

The Prince-Albert-Society (Patron: HRH The Duke of Edinburgh) is a scholarly society founded in 1981 and devoted to research on scientific, cultural and political aspects of Anglo-German relations. Since ist beginnings, the society has organized annual conferences on a wide range of relevant topics. A joint foundation of the town of Coburg and the University of Bayreuth, the society is based in Coburg, an historic town of 40.000 inhabitants in the north of Bavaria and former seat of the dukes of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha.

Appel à communication : Furniture and the Domestic Interior (New York, 27 Oct 17)

Fauteuil, vers 1730 – 1770, 102.9 x 71.1 x 62.2 cm, New York, Frick Collection.

Type : Appel à communication

Date limite de l’appel : 18 juin 2017

Date de l’événement : 27 octobre 2017

Lieu : New York, Frick Collection

The Furniture History Society and The Frick Collection invite submissions from PhD students, post-doctorates, and emerging museum scholars for a symposium dedicated to the history of furniture and interiors in Europe, Britain, and the United States. « Furniture and the Domestic Interior: 1500-1915 » is the Furniture History Society’s fourth Research Seminar, following previous academic events at the Wallace Collection in London (2015, 2012) and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York (2014). Continuer la lecture

Journées d’étude : « Norwich and the Medieval Parish Church c.900-2017: the Making of a Fine City »

Anglican Cathedral of the Most Holy Trinity, Norwich, county of Norfolk, UK

Type : Journées d’étude
Date : 17, 18 et 19 juin 2017
Lieu : The Weston Room, Norwich Cathedral Hostry, Norwich, United Kingdom

A conference hosted by The Medieval Parish Churches of Norwich Research Project (undertaken at the University of East Anglia and funded by The Leverhulme Trust). All 58 churches, whether existing, ruined or lost, are included in the scope of the project, which seeks insight into how the medieval city developed topographically, architecturally and socially. The Project is intended to reveal the interdependent relationship between city, community and architecture showing how people and places shaped each other during the middle ages. The conference (supported by the Paul Mellon Centre for British Art and Purcell) will present the medieval parish churches of Norwich in their immediate local context and in the broader framework of urban churches in Britain and northern Europe. The subject range will include documentary history, the architectural fabric of the buildings themselves and their place in the topography of Norwich, the development of the churches’ architecture and furnishings, the representation of the churches and their post-Reformation history. Continuer la lecture

Appel à communication : « Art and the Environment in Britain. 1700-Today »

John Martin, The Destruction of Pompei and Herculaneum, 1822, huile sur toile, Londres, Tate Britain.

John Martin, The Destruction of Pompei and Herculaneum, 1822, huile sur toile, Londres, Tate Britain.

Type : Appel à communication
Date de la manifestation : 2 au 3 mars 2017
Lieu : Université Rennes 2
Date limite : 3 septembre 2016

Continuer la lecture