Archives par étiquette : Amsterdam

Publication : « Amsterdam’s Atlantic : Print Culture and the Making of Dutch Brazil ».

VAN GROESEN Michiel, Amsterdam's Atlantic : Print Culture and the Making of Dutch Brazil, Philadelphie, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016, 288 p.

VAN GROESEN Michiel, Amsterdam’s Atlantic : Print Culture and the Making of Dutch Brazil, Philadelphie, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016, 288 p.

Présentation de l’éditeur :

In 1624 the Dutch West India Company established the colony of Brazil. Only thirty years later, the Dutch Republic handed over the colony to Portugal, never to return to the South Atlantic. Because Dutch Brazil was the first sustained Protestant colony in Iberian America, the events there became major news in early modern Europe and shaped a lively print culture.

Continuer la lecture

Publication : « Stories in Gilded Frames. Dutch seventeenth-century paintings with biblical and mythological subjects (Verhalen in vergulde lijsten. Bijbelse en mythologische schilderijen van Rembrandt en zijn tijdgenoten) ».

DE VRIES Lyckle, Stories in Gilded Frames. Dutch seventeenth-century paintings with biblical and mythological subjects, Amsterdam, Amsterdam university press, 2016, 304 p.

DE VRIES Lyckle, Stories in Gilded Frames. Dutch seventeenth-century paintings with biblical and mythological subjects, Amsterdam, Amsterdam university press, 2016, 304 p.

Présentation de l’éditeur :

Dutch painters in the seventeenth century frequently turned their brushes on subjects from the Bible or mythology. Such subjects, bringing with them whole stories with which patrons and art lovers were intimately familiar, were perfect for the dramatic designs and vibrant play of color and shadow that were these painters’ stock in trade.

This book presents the work of forty-one Dutch artists who handled Biblical and mythological stories in the period, including Rembrandt. Arranged chronologically, and copiously illustrated with full-color images of the paintings in question, the book shows how each of these paintings works with—or sometimes against—the conventions of the story it is telling, making use of the viewer’s knowledge of the subject and themes and finding ways to bring the familiar arrestingly to life. Lyckle de Vries sets each artist’s work in context of his career and influences—including influences from Flemish and Italian painters—and helps readers understand what the goals and intentions were as each artist set out on a painting.

A beautiful produced volume, Stories in Gilded Frames offers a new way of looking at one of the most enduringly popular periods in art history.

Plus d’informations sur le site de l’éditeur.

Publication : Confronting the Golden Age. Imitation and Innovation in Dutch Genre Painting 1680-1750.

AONO Junko, Confronting the Golden Age. Imitation and Innovation in Dutch Genre Painting 1680-1750, Amsterdam, Amsterdam University Press, 2015, 234 p.

AONO Junko, Confronting the Golden Age. Imitation and Innovation in Dutch Genre Painting 1680-1750, Amsterdam, Amsterdam University Press, 2015, 234 p.

Présentation de l’éditeur :

Is it possible to talk about Dutch art after 1680 outside the prevailing critical framework of the « age of decline »? Although an increasing number of studies are being published on the art and society of this period, genre painting of this era continues to be dismissed as an uninspired repetition of the art of the second and third quarters of the seventeenth century, known as the Dutch Golden Age.
In this stunningly illustrated study, Aono reconsiders the long-dismissed genre painting from 1680-1750. Grounded in close analysis of a range of paintings and primary sources, this study illuminates the main features of genre painting, highlighting the ways in which these elements related to the painters’ close connections to, on the one hand, collectors, and on the other, to classicism, one of the dominant artistic styles of that time.
Three case studies, richly supplemented by a catalogue of 29 selected painters and their work, offer the first clear picture of the genre painting of the period while providing new insights into painters’ activities, collectors’ tastes and the contemporary art market.

Junko Aono is an associate professor of Art History, at the Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan and received her PhD on Dutch genre painting 1680-1750 from the University of Amsterdam in 2011. Her publications include articles in major scientific magazines, such as Oud Holland and Simiolus, and contributions to exhibitions such as Milkmaid by Vermeer and Dutch Genre Painting (Tokyo, 2007) and Nicolaas Verkolje (Enschede, 2011). Junko Aono is Associate Professor at the Faculty of Arts and Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka.

Plus d’informations sur le site de l’éditeur.

Publication : Louis XIV Outside In : Images of the Sun King Beyond France, 1661–1715.

CLAYDON Tony (éds.) et LEVILLAIN Charles-Édouard (éds.), Louis XIV Outside In : Images of the Sun King Beyond France, 1661–1715, Farnham, Ashgate, décembre 2015, 231 p.

CLAYDON Tony (éds.) et LEVILLAIN Charles-Édouard (éds.), Louis XIV Outside In : Images of the Sun King Beyond France, 1661–1715, Farnham, Ashgate, décembre 2015, 231 p.

Présentation de l’éditeur :

Louis XIV —the ‘Sun King’— casts a long shadow over the history of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Europe. Yet while he has been the subject of numerous works, much of the scholarship remains firmly rooted within national frameworks and traditions. Thus in France Louis is still chiefly remembered for the splendid baroque culture his reign ushered in, and his political achievements in wielding together a strong centralised French state; whereas in England, the Netherlands and other protestant states, his memory is that of an aggressive military tyrant and persecutor of non-Catholics.

In order to try to break free of such parochial strictures, this volume builds upon the approach of scholars such as Ragnhild Hatton who have attempted to situate Louis’ legacy within broader, pan-European context. But where Hatton focused primarily on geo-political themes, Louis XIV Outside In introduces current interests in cultural history, integrating aspects of artistic, literary and musical themes. In particular it examines the formulation and use of images of Louis XIV abroad, concentrating on Louis’ neighbours in northwest Europe. This broad geographical coverage demonstrates how images of Louis XIV were moulded by the polemical needs of people far from Versailles and distorted from any French originals by the particular political and cultural circumstances of diverse nations. Because the French regime’s ability to control the public image of its leader was very limited, the collection highlights how—at least in the sphere of public presentation—his power was frequently denied, subverted, or appropriated to very different purposes, questioning the limits of his absolutism which has also been such a feature of recent work.

Sommaire :

Introduction : Louis XIV Upside Down? Interpreting the Sun King’s Image, Tony Claydon and Charles-Édouard Levillain.
1. Image Battles under Louis XIV : Some Reflections, Hendrik Ziegler.
2. Francophobia in Late-17th-Century England, Tim Harris.
3. ‘We Have Better Materials for Clothes, They, Better Taylors’ : The Influence of La Mode on the Clothes of Charles II and James II, Maria Hayward.
4. The Court of Louis XIV and the English Public Sphere: Worlds Set Apart ?, Stéphane Jettot.
5. Popular English Perceptions of Louis XIV’s Way of War, Jamel Ostwald.
6
. Louis XIV, James II and Ireland, D.W. Hayton.
7. Lampooning Louis XIV : Romeyn de Hooghe’s Harlequin Prints, 1688–89, Henk van Nierop.
8. Foe and Fatherland: The Image of Louis XIV in Dutch Songs, Donald Haks.
9. Amsterdam and the Ambassadors of Louis XIV 1674–85, Elizabeth Edwards.
10. Millenarian Portraits of Louis XIV, Lionel Laborie.

Pour en savoir plus, rendez-vous sur le site de l’éditeur.