Archives par étiquette : Amérique

Appel à publication : Cartographic Styles and Discourse

Georges Boissaye du bocage, Le grand blanc de terre Neuve, 1771, 96 x 64,5 cm, Paris, bibliothèque nationale de France.

Type : Appel à publication

Date limite ; 22 septembre 2017

This is a call for proposals to be considered in the constitution of a thematic issue of Artl@s Bulletin which will explore the intersection of art and cartography in a range of historical and geographic contexts. Centuries-old representations of land from around the globe are known for their conceptual characteristics, such as indigenous American, medieval Mediterranean, and Chinese silk maps whose ‘world views’ are often clearly rooted instead in their unique social perspectives. Art and cartography again come together in modern maps that consciously reject the empiricism of enlightenment-era cartography in favor of culturally-meaningful aesthetics. In some contemporary maps, the particular way that ideas and information become visualized, including through the use of unconventional materials or new technologies, arguably shapes their outcomes just as much or more than any physical territory. Continuer la lecture

Publication : « Connecting Art Markets. Guilliam Forchondt’s Dealership in Antwerp (c.1632–78) and the Overseas Paintings Trade ».

VAN GINHOVEN Sandra, Connecting Art Markets. Guilliam Forchondt’s Dealership in Antwerp (c.1632–78) and the Overseas Paintings Trade, Leiden, Brill, 2016, 330 p.

VAN GINHOVEN Sandra, Connecting Art Markets. Guilliam Forchondt’s Dealership in Antwerp (c.1632–78) and the Overseas Paintings Trade, Leiden, Brill, 2016, 330 p.

Présentation de l’éditeur :

Based on Guilliam Forchondt’s surviving business documentation in Antwerp and applying an aggregate and data-driven approach, Connecting Art Markets focuses on the role of art dealers in mediating the supply and demand for art, behaving in particular ways as to influence the markets for artworks in which they were strategically invested. Van Ginhoven presents her findings on Guilliam Forchondt’s workshop production volumes and transatlantic art trade flows, and evaluates the relationship between the production paintings in the Southern Netherlands, their local, regional and overseas distribution channels, and the markets for these works in Europe and the Americas during the seventeenth century.

Sandra van Ginhoven, Ph.D (2015), Duke University, is a lecturer at Erasmus University Rotterdam. She has published articles on the role of art dealers and her research at the intersection between art history and economics engages tools for data analysis and visualization.


Plus d’informations sur le site de l’éditeur.